News

Allocution, March 6, First Sunday of Lent

Today, March 6, I Sunday of Lent, we hear in all the Catholic churches of the world the Gospel according to Saint Luke chapter 4 verses 1 to 13.
(GOSPEL)
Lent is a journey. The people of God were and are a pilgrim people. He walked through the desert for four hundred years to reach the land promised by God. Moses, to meet God, had to climb Mount Sinai where he stayed forty days; Elijah also had his appointment with God on Mount Horeb, which he arrived after forty days of pilgrimage, a long and costly journey along which he found himself disarmed and stripped of everything and, furthermore, persecuted. Jesus Christ spent forty days in the desert and with fasting and prayer defeated the devil.

“Lent is the privileged time of interior pilgrimage towards him who is the source of mercy,” wrote Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI. Each one of us has begun Lent, forty days towards Holy Week, which we want to celebrate as saints, conquerors of the devil, cleansed of sins by confession, strengthened by the daily reading of the Word of God in prayer, detached from everything that which hinders us from being what we are: children of God, brothers of all.

But the devil is very interested in destroying our happiness. “The devil tells me: ‘you will not be able to solve your problems’; Christ tells me: ‘God will make straight your paths’ (Proverbs 3, 5-6).” “The devil tells me: ‘it is impossible to do good, it is impossible to forgive’; Christ tells me: ‘what is impossible with men is possible with God’ (Luke 18, 27).” “The devil tells me: ‘you feel alone, you don’t understand anything and no one understands you’; Christ tells me: ‘I will not leave you, I will not abandon you’ (Deuteronomy 31, 6).” “The devil tells me: ‘you will not be able to do what God asks of you, it is inhuman’; Christ tells me: ‘I will cover you with my feathers, under my wings you will find refuge’ (Psalm 90).” “The devil tells me: ‘you have sinned a lot, you have no forgiveness from God’; Christ tells me: ‘God who is faithful will forgive you’ (1 John 1, 9).” “The devil tells me: ‘you don’t know how to move forward’; Christ tells me: ‘I will show you the way’ (Psalm 32, 8).” “The devil tells me: ‘you are afraid, you can’t’; Christ tells me: ‘do not be afraid, I am with you’ (Isaiah 43, 4).” “The devil tells me: ‘you are useless, no one values ​​what you do’, Christ tells me: ‘you are precious in my eyes’ (Isaiah 43, 4).” “The devil tells me: ‘no one loves you, no one takes you into account’; Christ tells me: ‘I have you tattooed in the palm of my hands’ (Isaiah 49, 16).” “The devil tells me: ‘the way of your God is very strange and incomprehensible’, Christ tells me: ‘I am the way, the truth and the life’ (John 14, 16).”

(SINGING)

Buddhist parable:
A poor man who suffers hardships, living off alms and odd jobs, has carried with him for years a precious pearl sewn into the hem of his cloak. Carrier of an incalculable treasure, he never realized it. It had all started the day he visited a friend with whom he enjoyed a good dinner. After the meal continued, drink after drink, the visitor began to drowsy. His friend, about to leave for a trip, preferred not to wake him; As a farewell gift he left him a precious pearl and to prevent its loss he skillfully pinned it to the hem of the visitor’s cloak, darning it around it. He left her a few farewell lines, but did not mention the pearl so that it would be a surprise. The rich man wakes up the next morning without knowing it, but does not realize the treasure with which he has been blessed. The years and adventures of traveling through another country pass, he works hard and has to be content living with the greatest frugality. One day, unexpectedly, he meets his old friend halfway. Surprised by his miserable appearance, he reproaches him for wasting the gift, but the friend does not know what he means. “Well, the pearl I gave you, open the hem of your cloak.” Indeed, the valuable gem was found intact there. “By not realizing the treasure you harbored you have lived miserably, do not waste it later, go quickly to change it, to satisfy your need.” Each one of us has a pearl, in these forty days of Lent discover the pearl of your life that is within you.

(SINGING)

Saint Maximus, the confessor, gives us five reasons why God allows temptations:
First: so that attacks and counterattacks lead us to the discernment of good and evil.
Second: so that our virtue maintained in effort and struggle is affirmed.
Third: so that advancing in virtue we avoid presumption and appreciate humility.
Fourth: to inspire us with the experience that we have an unreserved abhorrence of evil.
Fifth: and above all so that upon reaching inner freedom we are convinced of our weakness and the strength of the one who has helped us.

(SINGING)

To persevere is to overcome temptation. Thomas Edison invented the light bulb, he did more than 2000 experiments before achieving success. A journalist asked him how he felt about failing so many times. He responded: “I didn’t fail once, it was just a 2,000-step process.” After gradually losing his hearing, composer Ludwig Van Beethoven became totally deaf, yet he wrote his best music during his final years through his perseverance. A ball fan approached some boys who were watching a game and asked them: “How is the game?”; They responded: “our team is losing ten to zero.” The fan told them: “but I don’t see you very worried or sad.” The boys said: “we haven’t hit yet.” Persevere in your attempts to reach holiness; announce the Gospel to those you love; build a beautiful family, a beautiful church, a beautiful town. In the end, God will rise up with you and everything will be better.

Our Father, do not let us fall into temptation, do not leave us on the road. In the hard moment of temptation, give us the strength of your spirit to keep us firm as trees, standing before the hurricane; do not let us fall into the ruins of the hopeless old man; Do not let us fall into fatigue, indifference, apathy, reluctance, defeat… You are our God.
From the Pope’s message this Lent:
“Let us not get tired of praying. Jesus has taught us that it is necessary to always pray without getting discouraged. We need to pray because we need God. Thinking that we are enough for ourselves is a dangerous illusion. With the pandemic we have felt our personal and social fragility. May Lent now allow us to experience the comfort of faith in God, without which we cannot have stability. No one is saved alone, because we are all in the same boat in the midst of the storms of history, but, above all, no one is saved by God, because only the paschal mystery of Jesus Christ allows us to overcome the dark waters of death. Faith does not exempt us from the tribulations of life, but it allows us to go through them united with God in Christ, with the great hope that does not disappoint and whose pledge is the love that God has poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit.

(SINGING)

“Let us not tire of removing evil from our lives. May the corporal fasting that the Church asks of us in Lent strengthen our spirit to fight against sin. Let us not tire of asking for forgiveness in the sacrament of penance and reconciliation, knowing that God never tires of forgiving. Let us not tire of fighting against concupiscence, that fragility that drives us towards selfishness and all kinds of evil and that throughout the centuries has found different ways to plunge man into sin. One of these ways is the risk of dependence on digital media that impoverishes human relationships. Lent is a favorable time to counteract these snares and cultivate, instead, a more integral human communication, made of real face-to-face encounters.”

(SINGING)

“Let us not tire of doing good and active charity toward our neighbors. During this Lent let us practice almsgiving by giving with joy. God, who provides seed to the sower and bread to eat, provides each of us not only with what we need to survive, but also so that we can be generous in doing good to others. If it is true that our entire life is a time to sow good, let us especially take advantage of this Lent to care for those close to us, to become neighbors to those brothers and sisters who are wounded on the path of life. Lent is a favorable time to seek and not avoid those who are in need; to call and not ignore those who wish to be heard and receive a good word, to visit and not abandon those who suffer from loneliness. Let us put into practice the call to do good to all, taking time to love the smallest and most defenseless, the abandoned and despised, those who are discriminated against and marginalized.”

(SINGING)

From Monday, March 7 to Friday, March 11, from 2 to 4 in the afternoon, conferences and musical works will be broadcast within the framework of the sacred and religious music week on the CMBF station, national music radio. We bow our heads to receive the blessing. At the end of each invocation we pray amen.
Merciful Father God, grant to all of you, like the evil son, the joy of returning to your father’s house… Amen.
May Christ, model of prayer and life, guide you to the authentic conversion of the heart through the path of Lent… Amen.
May the spirit of wisdom and strength sustain you in the fight against the evil one, so that you may celebrate the Easter victory with Christ… Amen.
And may the blessing of Almighty God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit descend upon you, upon your families and always accompany you… Amen.

(SINGING)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *